Helping the Chronically Overworked Find Life Balance

The 5 Biggest Mistakes Overworked People Make

woman in a hurry on emailMore than one in three people say that they are chronically overworked. And more than 30% of both men and women would take a pay cut to spend more time with their children. Here are some of the most common mistakes overworked people make when trying to achieve a balanced life.

 

Mistake Number 1: Not Having a Plan

Few of us get into an overworked lifestyle overnight. Usually it is something that builds up over time. We have to change the habits of overwork, and that all can’t happen overnight. Instead of trying to change everything at once, pick one area to make a change. Stopping work earlier at night to get more sleep is a good place to start.

Mistake Number 2: Not recognizing your true values and priorities

There was a time when I was working 90 hours a week. If you asked me, I would have told you that I was a family first person. In reality though, I couldn’t be family first when I was working so much. I was a work first person. Our values are demonstrated by what we do, not what we think. To work less, we need to recognize that we have made work our highest priority.

Mistake #3: Not taking stock of who you really are

All of us are many people. I have a career identity, and I am a father, son, friend, husband, soccer coach, football fan… When I was working 90 hours a week, my identity revolved around my job and career. Working fewer hours involved cultivating my other identities, which led to different decisions over time.

Mistake #4: Not enlisting help

An identity as a people-first person can help make changes in the short run. But without a community of people to support our changes, we will gradually fall back into our old habits. A good place to start is with a spouse or significant other. How can they support you to make a change? Friends, parents, and siblings are also great places for support.

Mistake #5: Not letting go

For many people, success to a certain point has come from hard work trying to keep all the balls in the air. But there are an infinite number of things that we can’t control. And in reality, we control far fewer things that we think we do. Realizing that busyness is not the same as effectiveness can be painful. “You mean that all this time I’m putting in has no impact?” That is exactly what I’m saying. I had more impact when I was working 60 hours than when I was working 90 hours. And I was more effective working less than 50 hours when I was working 60 hours.

Knowing these common mistakes and how to avoid them will surely change the way you look at your life balance. But it’s not enough.

Not only do you have to know what NOT to do, but you also have to make some positive changes to really cut back your work hours. After all, if having a balanced life were that easy, everyone would have more time for the people they really care about.

Comments

  1. Greg,
    I love this post! The particularly resonant part was how we might call ourselves one thing yet behave in a contradictory manner to our proclaimed values. Realigning our behaviors with our beliefs goes a long way in restoring inner harmony! It’s always good to be reminded we’re in charge of sculpting our own lives, thank you.

  2. Thank you Christy. spot on!