Helping the Chronically Overworked Find Life Balance

Should Success Be Based On Results or Politics?

Chapter 9: Paint Your Environment Part 11

It really isn’t the same everywhere.
For example, some company cultures tend to drive people towards unethical decisions[i] (More here).  In an analogous way, some company cultures drive people more towards corporate idolatry. Employees are expected to “do what it takes” to meet deadlines, and to sacrifice their personal time if the boss asks. I believe that a company with a Results Oriented Work Environment (ROWE) has a lower risk for corporate idolatry.

The philosophy behind ROWE is simple. Employees are responsible for results. How they get there is up to them, completely.  Employees are given the freedom to decide when to come into the office, and how best to meet their objectives.  Daniel Pink argues that ROWE is effective because it provides employees autonomy, i.e. control over their environment, which is intrinsically motivating.[ii] This testimonial from an employee at the GAP, a ROWE company, seems to support that notion.

ROWE has been such a huge support and peace of mind. It allows me to not feel guilty when I need to take care of personal issues. I always meet my deadlines and find alternate time to complete my work.”[iii]

ROWE was developed by Cali Ressler and Jody Thompson when they were in the HR department at Best Buy.  Now, they are consultants and speakers, helping to bring change to hundreds of companies.  I am skeptical about an individual’s ability to change a company culture.  But Ressler and Thompson present a way to make it possible, with a website filled with business cases and slide decks to help you justify a radical change to the way your company operates.

In one example, Suntell, a company that sells loan risk management software adopted a ROWE strategy.  They implemented a VOIP system that allows employees to work from anywhere, which saved the company 7% in phone expenses.  Many employees decided to work from home, which allowed the company to save 30% on rent by moving a smaller office .[iv]

ROWE is generally structured for departments or companies to adopt, but there are principles that can help individuals regain control of their time as well.

[i] Bad Apples, Bad Cases, and Bad Barrels: Meta-Analytic Evidence About Sources of Unethical Decisions at Work.  Kish-Gephart JJ, Harrison DA, Treviño LK. . J Appl Psychol. 2010 Jan;95(1):21

[ii] Drive by Daniel Pink.  Riverhead Book (2009) P 84-85.

[iii] Results Only Work Environment Case Study: GAP

[iv] Results Only Work Environment Case Study: Suntell

Why The Right Thing To Do Is A Business Case For Good

Chapter 9: Paint Your Environment Part 3

In 1994 Massachusetts had a statewide referendum that would have required companies to reduce the amount of product packaging. I lived in Boston and there was a raging debate between the environmentalists and the business community.  One side said that excess packaging is bad for the environment and costly to the public. The other side claimed that the costs of packaging reduction would be astronomical and cost jobs.  The measure was defeated 65% to 35%.

Fast forward to today – many companies cannot reduce their packaging quickly enough. The difference is the business case. Less packaging brings lower costs, a green brand, and in some cases more ease of use.  If you can deliver a better product at a lower cost, why wouldn’t the company do it?

Corporations are in business to make money, and it is very hard to argue that a company should make less money for any reason. It is far more effective to make a Business Case for Good.

If your company must decide between doing the right thing (A), or doing the wrong but less expensive thing (B), the worst thing you can do is to argue for “A” based on ethics. Instead, use your creativity to create a business case. For example, argue that A will differentiate your product in the market, and allow the company to command a higher price.  Or, argue that “B” will have higher support costs, or bring a legal risk.

Whatever you do, don’t EVER mention an ethical justification for A, not even as a fourth bullet point.  I’ve used a Business Case For Good on several occasions, and invariably someone else said “of course we should do A.  It’s the right thing to do.”  This is a test. If you agree, someone on the other side will use your agreement to bring the argument back to ethics, and you will lose.  Instead, be coldhearted, and say “That should not be a factor in the decision -we need to do what is best for the company.”

You want this to become a contest of who has the best numbers, and in the next post, I’ll show you how to properly buffer a revenue forecast.  If you make up better numbers than the other side, your company will start doing the right thing in spite of themselves.

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