Helping the Chronically Overworked Find Life Balance

Ray Rice: Defective NFL Product?

Janay Palmer & Ray Rice

Now wife, Janay Palmer and Raven’s suspended footlball player, Ray Rice

I’m on my home from the latest workshop by my coach Steve Harrison. Had a chance to meet Jack Canfield, author of the Chicken Soup for the Soul books. Wow, what an amazing experience.

It was an interesting experience learning how better to serve people through writing and coaching against the backdrop of the Ray Rice story. My understanding is that abusive people were themselves abused. It is my hope that this incident can help Mr. Rice break the cycle of abuse, both for himself and for others.

I watched the video. It was very disturbing. If you haven’t seen it, I think you should watch it Ray Rice Knocked Out Fiancee – FULL VIDEO. It will change your understanding of domestic violence forever. It won’t be theoretical, and it won’t be Hollywood. It is brutal. Watching the video could help you change someone’s life some day. You might hear a whisper, or notice something in someone you know, and instead of brushing it off, you’ll remember that image of Jinay getting knocked unconscious.

As for why the NFL and the Ravens gave Rice a slap on the wrist before the video came to light? I am befuddled by the handwringing. The NFL is a business. Ray Rice is the product. The domestic violence wasn’t seen as a human issue, it was a business issue.  Rice was a product with some characteristics that would make some customers mad.

I’ve been in those discussions. The product isn’t working quite right. Should we ship?

“No product is ever done.”

“There is a work around.”

“We need the revenue now, and will pick up the pieces later.”

Right or wrong does not come into play when it comes to these product shipment decisions. They are business decisions. In the case of the NFL, the products are people. We need to remember to put people first, always.

As I write this post on the plane, I watched an inspirational speech from James Brown, football host on CBS. Brown explained that domestic violence is not a football issue, and is not a woman’s issue. He pointed out that 3 women die every day from domestic violence, and called on men to step up and take responsibility. “You need to either get help [for yourself] or give help [to end domestic violence.]

Bravo James Brown. Real men do not hurt women, and we’ll take your challenge to become part of the solution.

Why The Right Thing To Do Is A Business Case For Good

Chapter 9: Paint Your Environment Part 3

In 1994 Massachusetts had a statewide referendum that would have required companies to reduce the amount of product packaging. I lived in Boston and there was a raging debate between the environmentalists and the business community.  One side said that excess packaging is bad for the environment and costly to the public. The other side claimed that the costs of packaging reduction would be astronomical and cost jobs.  The measure was defeated 65% to 35%.

Fast forward to today – many companies cannot reduce their packaging quickly enough. The difference is the business case. Less packaging brings lower costs, a green brand, and in some cases more ease of use.  If you can deliver a better product at a lower cost, why wouldn’t the company do it?

Corporations are in business to make money, and it is very hard to argue that a company should make less money for any reason. It is far more effective to make a Business Case for Good.

If your company must decide between doing the right thing (A), or doing the wrong but less expensive thing (B), the worst thing you can do is to argue for “A” based on ethics. Instead, use your creativity to create a business case. For example, argue that A will differentiate your product in the market, and allow the company to command a higher price.  Or, argue that “B” will have higher support costs, or bring a legal risk.

Whatever you do, don’t EVER mention an ethical justification for A, not even as a fourth bullet point.  I’ve used a Business Case For Good on several occasions, and invariably someone else said “of course we should do A.  It’s the right thing to do.”  This is a test. If you agree, someone on the other side will use your agreement to bring the argument back to ethics, and you will lose.  Instead, be coldhearted, and say “That should not be a factor in the decision -we need to do what is best for the company.”

You want this to become a contest of who has the best numbers, and in the next post, I’ll show you how to properly buffer a revenue forecast.  If you make up better numbers than the other side, your company will start doing the right thing in spite of themselves.

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The Benefits Of Working For an Ethical Company

Chapter 6: The Invisible Hand Of the Company part 10

Throughout much of the chapter, I have argued that it is extremely difficult to change company culture.  It’s so hard in fact, that I don’t think it’s worth trying if you aren’t the CEO, and even then it may not be possible.

But the good news is that there is a wide range of company cultures.  One of the greatest myths about the workplace is that “everyplace is like this.”  That isn’t true.  It is true that no place is perfect, but there is a dramatic difference in the ethical climate between companies.

The business ethics literature describes an ethical culture as a company with a focus on the “wellbeing of multiple stakeholders such as employees, customers and community,” whereas a culture that encourages unethical decisions has an “everyone for herself” mentality.[i]

And how can you tell which type of company you work for.  To state what is probably obvious, one place not to look is the written code of conduct.  According to a large statistical meta-analysis of the business ethics literature, the presence of a code of conduct is not correlated with actual behavior in the company.  What matters is that the code is enforced uniformly across the organization.[ii]

So how are people treated in your company?

Are bullies tolerated?  Are vendors treated fairly?  Are the leaders held to different standards?  Are certain people allowed to get away with swearing while others will get talked to by their manager?

The small things matter, because they are clues to what will happen when the big things come up.

For a happier, more balanced life, the long term solution is to separate your identity from the company.  More on that in the next chapter.  But in the short run, the best answer may be to change companies.  In my opinion, all things being equal, it is better to work for a company that treats people well because you will be treated well.

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[i] Bad Apples, Bad Cases, and Bad Barrels: Meta-Analytic Evidence About Sources of Unethical Decisions at Work.  Kish-Gephart JJ, Harrison DA, Treviño LK. . J Appl Psychol. 2010 Jan;95(1):21

[ii] Ibid

What Happens When High Integrity CEO Meets Toxic Culture?

Chapter 6:  Corporate Culture -The Invisible Hand of the Company Part 4

If you take a high integrity  person and put them in a toxic and/or unethical culture, which would win?  In other words, to what degree can an individual influence and change corporate culture?  It’s a question we’ll come back to multiple times in this chapter.

Lets start with an extreme example: What if Harry T Lobo, a highly respected and effective CEO we met in Chapter 4, were made the CEO of Goldman Sachs, a company thought by many to have an unethical culture. (Greg Smith’s very public resignation made public the callus and thoughtless way Goldman treated their clients. See this post on the subject for more.)  Harry, who is not known for his modesty, didn’t think he could change the company value system.  Harry told me “[It would] depend on the company, and how long the value system existed.  Goldman Sachs [is very big and is] proud of the way it operates.”  Harry explained to me that everyone working there shared those values, and the organization is too big to change by the CEO alone.

It took Harry five years to change the culture of the mid-sized organization he is currently running.  When he arrived, the company was full of “empire builders,”  with a “negative, finger pointing, aggressive culture.”  People who were resistant to the values he was instilling are “no longer around.”  Harry said that he let this happen over time, as people realized they no longer fit in they left, and people who espoused the values he was looking for were promoted.  (And see this post to see a case where Harry dismissed someone for being manipulative.)

This is a common theme I heard throughout the interviews I conducted, and is well described in the literature: People who fit best with the company values, whatever they may be, will tend to be promoted more quickly.

So how did Harry respond when he was working as a Senior VP in a toxic culture?  Did he change the culture, or was he changed by it?

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Why Good People Do Bad Things At Work

Chapter 3: The Corporation, The Real American Idol Part 16 (conclusion)

In my last post, I wrote about a meta-study of over 49,000 people that identified three drivers of unethical behavior at work: people, circumstances, and the corporate culture.  The last post focused on unethical people.  This post examines the elements of circumstances and corporate culture that can lead to unethical decisions.

Circumstance-centric drivers of unethical behavior

When the researchers analyzed what about a given situation can lead to an ethical or unethical decision, it basically came down to one thing: how does the decision maker perceive the consequence to other people?  With a perception of more immediate, severe, or local consequences, an unethical decision is less likely. Conversely, people are more likely to make an unethical decision if the potential consequences are long term, less severe, or will impact people far away.

Cultural drivers of unethical behavior correlate with the values of the organization.

As I have tried to demonstrate throughout this chapter, corporate culture is largely defined by the values and behavior, and certain cultures are more likely to encourage corporate idolatry.  In a similar way, Treviño’s research has shown that it is possible to identify certain elements of corporate culture that encourage unethical behavior.  A company with an “everyone for himself” mentality is much more likely to see unethical behavior than a culture that emphasizes the “wellbeing of multiple stakeholders such as employees, customers and community.”[i]

In addition, the presence of a written code of conduct did not correlate with ethical decisions, but “a properly enforced code of conduct can be a powerful influence on unethical choices.”[ii]  In other words, this paper reinforces the notion that actions and behaviors are the only true test of a value system.  The authors warn that “performance management systems that reward individual bottom-line achievement (no matter how it is achieved) and that failure to discipline self-serving behavior” are likely to give rise to a climate that tolerates unethical decisions.[iii]

As I studied the transcripts from the 80 hours of interviews I conducted for this book, I found corporate idolatry is influenced by the same three things: people, circumstances, and corporate culture.  The details, however, are different.  For example, Trevino found that age does not correlate with ethical behavior, I think it does correlate with corporate idolatry.

So on to Part II of Busting Your Corporate Idol.  The corporate ladder revisited is three chapters that examine how people, circumstances, and corporate culture contribute to a life of corporate idolatry.

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[i] Bad Apples, Bad Cases, and Bad Barrels: Meta-Analytic Evidence About Sources of Unethical Decisions at Work.  Kish-Gephart JJ, Harrison DA, Treviño LK. . J Appl Psychol. 2010 Jan;95(1):21

[ii] Ibid

[iii] Ibid