Helping the Chronically Overworked Find Life Balance

How Corporate Idolatry Negates a Rich Life

I can’t tell you how many people told me to drop corporate idolatry from my book title.

“People don’t want to hear about religion at work.” Or “Idolatry is a mortal sin, and I’m offended that you associate my hard work with idolatry.”

The most common objection is this: “Idola-what? I can’t pronounce it.” As a ten-year marketer, you’d think that I’d jump to modify the message in response to this feedback. Except isn’t that what Coke did when they developed New Coke in the 80s?

Coke’s rival Pepsi had a famous advertising campaign, the Pepsi challenge. It was a blind taste test, and people overwhelmingly picked Pepsi over Coke. The Coke executives panicked, and developed New Coke, a sweet soda like Pepsi. It was a disaster. Everyone hated new coke. It turns out that in a one swallow test, Pepsi wins. But if you ask people to drink an entire glass, Coke wins.  Oops. You need to be careful on how you interpret the data, and not to put too much weight on only one data point.

In the case of corporate idolatry, when I explain to people that corporate idolatry is a metaphor for overwork, heads start to nod. When I explain in detail, as I will below, people either smile or scowl. It is not unusual for arguments to break out, or for a discussion to go on for thirty minutes. Along the way, we’ve covered issues like missing family events for work, or the fear of a backlash if you say “no” to the bosses’ last minute request. An idea that sparks a deep discussion about priorities and values, by people who normally don’t think about these issues, is something to hold on to.

An idea that sparks a deep discussion about priorities and values, by people who normally don’t think about these issues, is something to hold on to.

Have you ever heard a phrase like “you need to do what is best for the company?” Let me guess, it wasn’t in the context of giving a promotion, planning an office party, or giving everyone a week of extra vacation. We use the phrase “best for the company” to justify an action that is unpopular, like canceling a project, or a decision that is perhaps unethical, like shipping a product that you know will not meet customers needs.

Doing what is “best for the company” is not the same as doing “what is best.” Every time we say yes to a company request that results in long hours is a no to someone else in our life. I know for what I speak, for there was a time when I was working 90 hours a week, and I thought that I was a family first person. It was a sobering moment when I realized that you cannot be family first AND work 90 hours a week. For example, when my cell phone rang during dinner, I told my family I had an important call and left the table.

Doing what is “best for the company” is not the same as doing “what is best.”

Which brings me to the real reason why people don’t like the phrase corporate idolatry—it hits too close to home. It is far easier to complain about how hard we are working. It allows us to play the victim:

  • I didn’t have any choice.
  • The job market is really competitive, and I don’t know if I would even get an interview if I were to apply today.
  • I am having a big impact, and there is no one else who can do what I do.

This last point illustrates the most insidious thing about corporate idolatry is that it warps the way we see the world. We agree with the company’s definition of what is important, and we buy into illusions that are no more real than the belief that sacrificing a goat to a statue could make it rain.

The real reason why people don’t like the phrase corporate idolatry—it hits too close to home.

To accept corporate idolatry means that we are no longer the victim, but an agent making choices. I am choosing to answer the email that comes in at 10 PM. I am choosing to take the phone call during dinner. I am choosing to eat lunch at my desk instead of leaving the office and meeting a friend for lunch. I am choosing to be at the regional sales meeting in Europe instead of at home for my kid’s birthday.

Yes, recognizing corporate idolatry can be painful initially. But it also provides the path to a more balanced life. It opens the space to start putting people first. We choose not to answer the phone, or to accept the lunch invitation from a friend, even when a large deliverable is due the next day.

Just don’t tell your boss that the company is no longer the most important thing in your life. Instead, use your political skills to defer, delegate, or de-scope deliverable requests. No point getting burned at the stake just to make a point.

This post originally appeared on the blog Switch & Shift

What Happens When Features Are Dropped To Make a Launch Date?

Chapter 9: Paint Your Environment Part 6

Ever been on a project that is under time pressure to make a launch date?  One common solution  is to drop features from the product.  For example, when Apple launched the iPad mini in November  2012, it did not have the retina display.  I have no knowledge of how that decision was made, but I can easily speculate that this feature was not included to bring in the launch date.

“Sabina” was a product manager working in lifescience industry who was part of a project that had to make that very choice.  She was working on a new technology to detect and quantify a particular RNA within a sample.  When the original product was scoped, it was designed to meet a set of unmet customer needs, and she created a healthy revenue forecast to justify the expense of development.  Sabina explained the difficulty of creating a forecast for a new technology.

“When you build [mathematical] models, you try to make an intelligent metric,” which was based on sizing the market, and estimating the market share based on what the product could do relative to the competition.  Sabina explained that she felt “pressured to show there is value in doing the project, a positive NPV.  I never felt that I wasn’t being truthful, [but] with a brand new technology, it’s sticking your finger in the air and making the best guess you can.  There was equal pressure from myself and others.”

A forecast is built on assumptions. One key (although often unstated) assumption is that the product will meet the customer’s needs.  Notice how the impact of the assumptions as  Sabina continues her story.

“When I did the original model [at the start of the project] there were assumptions of what we could commercialize.  [As the project progressed,] we had to cut out 2/3 of the features.  Do I want to cut the revenue model?  At that point if I had cut it as much as I should have, the project may have gotten killed.  Yet I believed in it enough longer term, not just first release.”  Sabina made a quiet internal assumption that it would take multiple iterations to get it where the customers really needed it to be.

Unfortunately, the organization was very tied to the forecasts, which came in at 25% of the pre-launch levels.  This in turn meant that additional development resources were not allocated to help the product grow.  And life was difficult for Sabina, with lots of questions from her management team.  “I felt like a failure because [the forecast] was so off.”

In the next post, I will explore Sabina’s options, through the filter of corporate idolatry.

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3 Steps to Identifying Your Key Customer. Advice for Writers, Entrepreneurs, or Everyone?

Creative Independence by Nattu via Flickr

Who is your target customer?  Its a question I hear as a new writer, and one I often asked in business settings.   It’s a fundamental question about people, that touches and issues of focus, values, and priorities.  I asked marketing guru Dan Janal to write a guest post on the subject.  

When I coach my clients, and I ask them who their key customer is.  They usually say, “Everyone.”

That’s because they honestly believe that their message can help everyone.  And it probably can.

The trouble is, the market doesn’t like solutions that appeal to the masses. Today, people want their own customized solution, or at least someone who is an expert in their industry.  The key to winning that business is to focus on the prospects who are your best fit.

Here are three questions I ask my coaching clients to explore so they can find their best prospects and their idea customer.

Question 1. Who do you like to work with?

Yes, it is all about you. Why shouldn’t you work with people you want to work with?  Why not find people who get you and understand you, people you like and understand?  What could be worse than dealing with a person who is the epitome of everything you hate? If you are going to work independently, you find someone you like to work with.  If not, you might as well get a job.

Question 2. Who are the people who like to work with you?

Let’s face it. We’re not a perfect fit for everyone. Some people don’t like the fact you won’t work past 6 p.m. at night, won’t take business calls on weekends and won’t cut your rates to rock bottom just because they asked. Who needs them? I’m sure you can find lots of other attributes you hate in clients (i.e. Type A personalities, people who can’t make decisions, people who don’t pay their bills on time, people who see the negative in everything, people who don’t praise your work. You get the idea.) Who needs them? Life is too short to work with jerks.

Question 3. Can they afford to pay you?

Just because you can help everyone in the world doesn’t mean you have to help everyone in the world. Some people will not want to pay your full fee or can’t afford to hire you. Your skill set might help the people just out of college just as well as it helps the vice president who wants to move into the president’s office. Who has more money to pay you? Unless your passion is to help people just out of college, go for the gold.  There’s nothing wrong with wanting to help the college student if that’s where your heart is. In fact, if you follow your heart, you’ll feel fulfilled, which might be better than money.

Helping people who want you to help them and get paid a fair wage  – Isn’t that what running your business is all about?

Dan Janal coaches authors, speakers, consultants and small businesses who want to become thought leaders and the obvious choice.  For info on his service, go to http://www.PublicityLeadstoProfits.com